investing · Personal Finance

The Best Books On Economics

A lot of folks complain to me about the dense nature of economics and government policy, something that deters them from getting involved with the market or reading the subject matter. As a result, I decided to drop the following list here, with the intent of providing a shortcut to the volumes that help simplify issues for the average American goober.

On Stock Market Investing

The Intelligent investor by Benjamin Graham

Stocks for the Long Run by Jeremy Siegel

A Random Walk Down Wall Street by Burton Malkiel

The Little Book of Common Sense Investing  by John C. Bogle

How a Second Grader Beats Wall Street  by Allan Roth

On Real Estate Investing

How To Be a Capitalist Without Any Capital by Nathan Latka

On Economic History

Socialism and Human Action by Ludwig von Mises

The Global Minotaur by Yanis Varoufakis

Capitalism and Freedom by Milton Friedman

Capitalism In America by Alan Greenspan

An Empire of Wealth by John Steele Gordon

On Economic Policy

Who Stole the American Dream? by Hedrick Smith

Retirement Heist  by Ellen Schultz

Temp by Louis Hyman

Maxed Out  by James Scurlock

Uncategorized

What If Success Destroys You?

Being born in the West – or migrating here and getting steeped in its culture—means meeting certain expectations: you must dive into the rat race, striving for the highest level of education and salary possible. Choosing to be a non-conformist is unacceptable.

But what happens when a person makes that choice? It’s one of the greatest conflicts of liberalism, a matter usually explained away as the fault of mental illness, extremism, or laziness, each reason carefully avoiding any legitimacy. After all, liberalism only works if our lives collectively obsess with growth.

Of course the world is more complicated than the Liberal State likes to pretend, and the cracks are beginning to show. Take this article from our lovely sisters at Hufflepuff. It tells the story of a “model minority” who slaved for years to get into a good school, only to drop out after a few weeks.

Is she a white supremacist? A person struggling with autism? Perhaps an angry misogynist? Some other thing that liberalism can avoid responsibility for?

Apparently not. The young lady was burnt out and destroyed by the stresses and pressure of Liberal Culture. Consider the following quote:

“I knew deep down that I was only following the path designated to me through expectations. I was following the promise of fortune and success as defined by my parents.”

True enough. The fixation she had ingrained on status and material success led to insomnia, stress, and her search for a simpler, albeit not as spotlight-hungry existence. Imagine that.

I would argue liberal superiority is slowly dying. Over the next several decades, we shall bear witness to how successful its maniacal devotion to economic growth, aimless diversity, and atomization has become.